Outdoor Art in Tuscany – Where to See It! 

If you’ve wandered through the Uffizi, said hello to David at the Accademia, and gazed at other masterpieces in Tuscany’s museums, it’s time to head outdoors!  

Road trip through the countryside, take a day trip to a nearby city, or go for a walk and discover some of Tuscany’s arte. 

I’m a mamma of three based in Tuscany, and we spend plenty of time seeking out art in the great outdoors. We’re happy to share our list of where to find outdoor art in Tuscany. 

Some of the places/pieces in the list below are well-known, and others are hidden. All are worth visiting! For each, I’ve also included the location, if it’s free or paid, if it’s stroller-friendly, what to see and do nearby, and the official website (if applicable).

Andiamo – let’s go! 

Map of Outdoor Art in Tuscany 

Chianti Sculpture Park 

Boys play with rainbow sculpture in forest.

The Chianti Sculpture Park is an outdoor sculpture park that you visit by following a trail through a wooded area. It contains contemporary artwork and sculptures by artists from around the globe.  

My children love exploring the circuit, and so do I. Bring a snack or picnic and sit down at one of the benches or in the theatre area. 

There are also concerts and events, especially during the summer months – so take a look at the website to see if you can catch one.  

Before or after your visit, be sure to drive through or walk around Pievasciata next door (see more below). 

Location: Pievasciata 
Free/Paid: Paid 
Stroller-Friendly: Yes, you can take your stroller along the trail (I have), but there are a couple of exhibits you can’t reach by stroller. For those, you can either walk or skip them.  
Nearby: Siena, Chianti villages, Monteriggioni 
Info: Chianti Sculpture Park official website 

Take a look at my guides to 
Monteriggioni 
Chianti During the Grape Harvest 

And if you’re travelling with little ones, check out 
Siena with Kids 
Panzano in Chianti with Kids 
Radda in Chianti with Kids 
Greve in Chianti with Kids 
Castellina in Chianti with Kids 

Good To Know: There’s another outdoor sculpture park in Southern Tuscany – the Giardino di Daniel Spoerri

Pievasciata 

Bell pepper sculptures in a yard with cypress trees and a house in Tuscany, Italy.

If you visit the Chianti Sculpture Park, be sure to combine it with a quick visit to Pievasciata, the tiny hamlet next door. Pievasciata has quirky art scattered throughout the streets – like a red phone booth, a painter, enormous red and yellow bell peppers, the couple with their heads in the trees, a gun with a knotted barrel, and more.  

Location: Pievasciata 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: Yes, you can take your stroller in the hamlet of Pievasciata. You can also walk to sculptures that are just outside the hamlet, using the small country roads. But, if you’re in a hurry, just drive around in your car looking for them.  
Nearby: Siena, Chianti villages, Monteriggioni, Chianti Sculpture Park 
Info: public place, open year-round 

Giardino dei Tarocchi  

Colorful sculptures tower over people walking on a forest path in Italy.

If you’re in Maremma in Southern Tuscany, try to work this place into your itinerary. Niki Saint Phalle’s colorful and quirky Giardino dei Tarocchi (Tarot Garden) will likely remind you of Gaudi’s Parc Güell in Barcelona. The sculptures and buildings are made up of mosaics created with pieces of glass, ceramics, and mirrors.  
It’s important to book your tickets in advance, as entry is limited and it often sells out. 

Location: Capalbio 
Free/Paid: Paid 
Stroller-Friendly: You can bring a stroller in and see some of the park, but it’s best to leave your stroller if you want to explore all the buildings and sculptures (there are steps and crowded areas).  It’s a tiny park, so little ones can walk, or you can carry your baby (or use a baby carrier). 
Nearby: Capalbio, Maremma beaches 
Info: Giardino dei Tarocchi official website 

Check out 
Quick Guide to Visiting The Tarot Garden 
Capalbio with Kids 

Peccioli’s Giants 

Giant sculpture coming out from the ground in the countryside in Peccioli, Tuscany.
One of Peccioli’s Giants

The Giants of Peccioli are… four giants in Peccioli! These humongous sculptures are one of the highlights of art-filled Peccioli. They rise up from the earth in multiple sites around the town dump – as a symbol of the importance of paying attention to the environment. The heights of the Giants vary, from about 5 to 9 meters. Our favorite is in the Fonte Mazzolo Amphitheatre, and you can reach it on foot from the village. There’s also one on top of a building that you can see from the road (Via Silvestro Lega) and two in the landfill itself (you have to make an appointment to see them). 

Location: Peccioli 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: Yes, you can bring your stroller around the village of Peccioli, and even down to the Giant in the amphitheatre. Keep in mind that the area around the Giant is dirt, so if it’s rained, it may be muddy. You can also bring your stroller in the parking lot of the Giant on the building (but you can see it easily from your car). The landfill Giants are best seen with a baby carrier. 
Nearby: Teatro del Silenzio (more outdoor art in Lajatico), Dinosaur Park of Peccioli (for hard-core dino enthusiast kids), colorful Ghizzano, San Gimignano, Volterra, San Miniato 
Info: Two of the Giants can be seen year-round, while you must reserve entrance to the other two here

Good To Know: The village of Peccioli has some other amazing outdoor art, so be sure to allow time to walk around before or after visiting the Giants. Our favorites are the rainbow bridge , the man peeking out from the roof of the building, and the cyclist’s mural (both seen from the rainbow bridge). 

Castello di Ama 

Boy walks past mirror outdoor art at Castello di Ama winery in Chianti, Italy.
My son, exploring the mirror exhibit at Castello di Ama

Castello di Ama combines wine and art – what more could you want? This Chianti winery showcases its award-winning wines alongside epic countryside views and contemporary art. My son loves the mirror installation and we always pick up a bottle of wine to bring home (get it in the shop in the hamlet below the winery). 

Location: Chianti, near Gaiole 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: No. There are too many steps and cobblestones. If you have a baby that needs to nap, you could carry your stroller into the winery while you taste wines. But, when you go to explore the hamlet and the art, leave your stroller behind. 
Nearby: Chianti villages, Brolio Castle 
Info: Castello di Ama official website. Some of the art can be seen in the hamlet even if the winery and shops are closed, but it’s best visited when things are open (in case gates are closed). 

You may want to check out 
Visiting Castello di Brolio with Kids 

Keith Haring’s Tuttomondo Mural

Close up of Keith Haring's Tuttomondo mural in Pisa, Italy. Colorful cartoon outlines, one with a television head and another holding a baby.

Visitors flock to Pisa to see its Leaning Tower, but there’s more to explore in the maritime city. There are a few murals on the streets of Pisa, and the most famous by far is the colorful Tuttomondo (All of the World), on a wall of a church (Sant’Antonio Abate). This was the last mural that Haring created before his death. 

We also like seeing the Fallen Angel sculpture by the Leaning Tower of Pisa and looking for smaller paintings and art on city walls. 

Location: Pisa 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: Yes, Pisa is stroller-friendly. 
Nearby: Lucca, beaches 
Info: public place, open year-round 

Check out 
Top Things to Do in Pisa
Tips for Visiting the Leaning Tower of Pisa 
Leaning Tower of Pisa Facts 
Pisa with Kids 
Leaning Tower of Pisa with Kids

O in Volterra 

You can see the ‘Big O’ on your way up the winding road to Volterra. The most famous of local artist Mauro Staccioli’s sculptures, it’s the perfect photo spot. Snap one of it alone and framing the spectacular Tuscan countryside. Or, set the timer and get yourself and your group in the frame!  

Location: Voltera 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: Yes, but it’s just a short dirt path from the parking area to the ‘O.’ 
Nearby: San Gimignano, Peccioli, beaches 
Info: public place, open year-round 

Big Benches 

Large green bench overlooking a vineyard in Tuscany. Castello di Meleto in background.
Castello di Meleto’s big bench

The Big Bench Community Project was started by an American living in the northern Italian region of Piedmont. Oversize benches are constructed and placed in positions with beautiful views and they’re always accessible to the public.  

While it’s now an international project, most of the benches are in Italy, and we have quite a few here in Tuscany. You can see the map of benches and choose one that’s close to you. 

Location: throughout Tuscany 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: Sometimes, but you often need to walk on a path to reach them. 
Info: public places, open year-round 

The Flying Vases  

Terracotta vases lifted up from the grass by long iron rods in the countryside in Tuscany, Italy.

You’re driving down the road and you see up ahead… flying vases? These vasi volanti are one of a few outdoor art pieces on the property of Fattoria La Loggia, on the edge of the Chianti Classico region.  

While you can’t tour the property if you’re not staying there or joining a wine tasting, you can definitely appreciate the flying vases from your car or the side of the road.  

Location: Montefiridolfi 
Free/Paid: Free, if seen from the road 
Stroller-Friendly: No. You can see them from your car, or the side of the road. Be careful of passing cars (it’s a tiny country road but cars speed past). 
Nearby: Chianti villages, Florence, San Gimignano 
Info: Fattoria La Loggio official website. You can see them from the road year-round  

Pietrasanta 

Sculptures in the main piazza of pietrasanta, italy.
Outdoor art in the piazza in Pietrasanta

Pietrasanta is a chic artist’s village known throughout Italy, and there’s always art on display in the main piazza and on the streets – it’s like an outdoor museum. You can also find art galleries scattered throughout the village.  

Michelangelo spent quite a bit of time in the marble quarries around Pietrasanta and nearby Carrara, and you can see an amazing mural by the international artist Eduardo Kobra in the marble quarries near Colonnata (reached by a hearty hike). 

Location: Pietrasanta 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: You can bring your stroller inside Pietrasanta.  
Nearby: Forte dei Marmi (with its famous market), Lucca 
Info: public place, open year-round 

Be sure to check out 
Visiting Forte dei Marmi 
Forte dei Marmi with Kids 
Forte dei Marmi’s Market 
Forte dei Marmi Beaches 
Beaches Near Florence
Visiting Lucca 
Lucca with Kids 

David Mural in Carrara Quarries 

Michelangelo spent quite a bit of time in the marble quarries around Pietrasanta and nearby Carrara, and you can see an amazing mural of Michelangelo’s David by the international artist Eduardo Kobra in the marble quarries near Colonnata (reached by a hearty hike). 

Location: near Colonnata, reached on foot 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: No 
Nearby: Forte dei Marmi, Lucca, Pietrasanta 
Info: public place 

Ghizzano 

Boy runs down colorful street in Ghizzano, Italy.

Ghizzano found its place on the map via Instagram and social media because of the gorgeous colors on the buildings of its main lane. Arrive for it, and stay a few minutes to explore the tiny lanes of Ghizzano, where you’ll find a few more pieces of outdoor art. 

Location: Ghizzano 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: Yes, you can take your stroller in the hamlet of Ghizzano. It’s also so tiny that early walkers will be fine (or you can carry them when they need it). There are some stairs off of the main street. 
Nearby: Teatro del Silenzio (more outdoor art in Lajatico), Dinosaur Park of Peccioli (for hard-core dino enthusiast kids), colorful Ghizzano, San Gimignano, Volterra, San Miniato 
Info: public place, open year-round 

Black Roosters in Chianti 

Large black rooster sculpture against an old city wall that has colorful banners hanging from it in the town of San Casciano in Val di Pesa in Tuscany, Italy.
The black rooster in San Casciano in Val di Pesa

To celebrate the 300-year anniversary of the creation of the Chianti Classico wine region, the 9 municipalities of the area were gifted gigantic black rooster statues. Why the black rooster? It’s the symbol of the Chianti Classico wine region (based on the legend of the black rooster).  

Look for the statues in: 

  • Greve in Chianti 
  • Panzano in Chianti 
  • Radda in Chianti 
  • Gaiole in Chianti 
  • Castellina in Chianti 
  • San Casciano in Val di Pesa 
  • Castelnuovo Berardenga 
  • Tavarnelle Val di Pesa 
  • Barberino Val di Pesa 
  • Poggibonsi 

Location: Chianti villages listed above 
Free/Paid: Free 
Stroller-Friendly: You can bring strollers in the Chianti villages, but some of the roosters are on roads so you can also see them from your car
Nearby: Siena, Florence, smaller Chianti hamlets and villages like Volpaia, Montefioralle, and San Donato in Poggio 
Info: public places, open year-round 

You may want to check out my guides to 
Radda in Chianti 
Gaiole in Chianti 
Castellina in Chianti 
Montefioralle 
San Donato in Poggio 

And if you’re travelling with little ones, check out 
Panzano in Chianti with Kids 
Radda in Chianti with Kids 
Greve in Chianti with Kids 
Castellina in Chianti with Kids  

Outdoor Art in Florence 

Boy walking up steps to see dragon statue in Florence, Italy garden.
My son checking out the dragon in the Orti del Parnaso (great views of Florence from this place!)

You’re spoiled with art in Florence, indoors and outdoors. Some of our favorite places to see art outside in Firenze are: 

  • The Loggia dei Lanzi (Piazza della Signoria) 
  • The Dragon sculpture (Orti del Parnaso) 
  • Sculptures in the Rose Garden 
  • The big face sculpture in Boboli Gardens 

Check out my monthly guides to visiting Florence: OctoberDecember

Best Outdoor Art in Tuscany to See with Kids 

Dogfish sculpture at Pinocchio Park in Collodi, Italy. Surrounded by bamboo forest. You can see people walking inside the mouth near the teeth. The dogfish is spraying water from its spout into the large pond in front of it.
My boys, inside the Great Whale in Pinocchio Park

Of the above places to see outdoor art in Tuscany, the favorites of my kids (currently ages 3, 6, and 9) are: 

  • Tarot Garden (amazing colors and reflections) 
  • Chianti Sculpture Park (great place to see art and run around) 
  • Pietrasanta (because it combines well with a visit to the beach) 
  • Black roosters in Chianti (like a scavenger hunt, even if they know where they all are at this point) 
  • Big benches (who doesn’t love sitting on a big bench?) 
  • Peccioli’s Giants (combines well with a visit to the village of Peccioli and to the Dinosaur Park for my dino-obsessed 6-year-old) 
  • Pinocchio Park in Collodi (not on the list, but included for its art path in the park) 

Any of these are a perfect addition to a day trip from Florence with your kids.

I hope you enjoy your visits to one or more of these sites while you’re in Tuscany!  

And, if you happen to make it to the next region north (Emilia Romagna), don’t miss the mural-filled village of Dozza – one of our favorite art-filled places in Italy! 

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